Have you heard of the window Tax?

Have you heard of the window Tax?

Windows! Yep! The window tax was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. It was a significant social, cultural, and architectural force in England, France, Ireland and Scotland during the 18th and 19th centuries. This tax was considered a “Property Tax”. We never had this tax in the U.S. That’s a blessing, we have enough taxes here.

How much was the window tax on houses back then? When the window tax was introduced, it consisted of two parts: a flat-rate house tax of 2 shillings per house, and a variable tax for the number of windows above ten windows. Properties with between ten and twenty windows paid an extra four shillings and those above twenty windows paid an extra eight shillings.

A shilling was worth 12 pennies so if I had ten windows in my house back then I would have to pay $1.20 for the windows and a flat rate of $.24 for the house. My tax for the year would be $1.44. That amount of money back in the 18th and 19th centuries not easy to come by.  The poor people boarded up all of their windows. The sun never shined through their windows into the house.

Is this when Rickets started? Yep, it started in the 17th century and was not eradicated until the researchers of the time found that sunlight was a cure for Rickets. Nowadays we know that vitamin D will keep people from getting rickets. But sunlight is the least expensive way to get your daily dose of vitamin D.

The tax was introduced in England and Wales to cover the money lost because of Money Clipping. Back in the day coins were made of pure silver and pure gold. These metals are a soft metal and could be shaved off around the edges and no one would be the wiser. These pieces were then melted down into bars and sold to goldsmiths to do with whatever they pleased.

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People bricked or boarded up their windows to save money for necessities in their daily activities.

In England and Wales, it was introduced in 1696 and was repealed in 1851, 156 years after first being introduced.

Abandoned Little Girls Bike!

8512d3661e77fb4f5fa60c5e213735e0Me and Aunt Theresa went to the Kmart store in Williamsport Pa. yesterday. We took the back way into the store because of traffic on Third Street. That’s when I saw a little girls pink bicycle laying on its side in a pile of dead leaves and rubbish.

I can’t seem to get the image out of my mind. The more it pops up in my head the more I want to find out what happened to the little girl who left it there or why she would just drop it there.

It’s a little bicycle, something an eight or nine year old would ride. So I’m thinking why would a child of that age be in the area of the bicycle. My imagination is running amuck!

Sometimes, not all the time, I get sensations from something I see. I’m not getting good sensations from this image.

Here it is a day later and I’m still questioning why, what happened to her and when.

I called the Williamsport Police Department and told them about the bike. I said “I don’t know if we have any missing children in Williamsport”. “It just seems odd that the little girls bike would be where it is”. They said they would look into it.

I probably will never find out what the story is with the little girl’s bike. I just pray it is a mistake that it was left there. Maybe someone stole it from her house and left it there. Okay for now that is what I will think because it’s the easiest for me to be satisfied with.

I returned to Kmart today with Aunt Theresa and I went in the back way even though the traffic was light. Aunt Theresa looked at me and said “you’re going to see if that girl’s bike is still there aren’t you?” “I’m just curious”, I said. The bike was gone and now I wonder if the Williamsport Police took it or what.

Thanks For Reading if you know anything about this please let me know.